About Bob McCarty

A native of Enid, Oklahoma, Bob McCarty graduated from Oklahoma State University with a degree in journalism in 1984. During the next two decades, he served stints as an Air Force public affairs officer, a political campaign manager, a technology sales consultant and a public relations professional. Since 2006, he has dedicated himself to full-time writing and, in October 2011, published his first nonfiction book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice. His second book, The CLAPPER MEMO, was released May 2013. Bob is married, has three sons and lives in the St. Louis area. NOTE: Bob is available for media and blogger interviews. Simply send a message containing all of the particulars of your request to him. He’ll try to respond as soon as possible.

TDIA Author Pens Fiction Novel

Three weeks ago, I began editing the 400-plus pages of the final draft of my still-untitled first fiction novel (a.k.a., “book #3). Today, I finished the process!

1560473_10202464425665591_755938409_nNow, it’s time to send the manuscript off for review by people with “fresh sets of eyes.”

I think you’ll like it when it’s released this summer, especially if you liked either of my first two books, Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO, both of which are nonfiction works and can be ordered in paperback and email formats at Amazon.com.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Senator McCaskill Proves To Be Long on ‘Wind,’ Short on Wisdom

After watching the video that accompanied a news release I received this afternoon from Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), I found the news release’s headline, “McCaskill Hears About Success of New Reform to Curb Military Sexual Assault,” incredibly misleading.

How was it misleading? The Show-Me State’s senior senator did more bloviating than she did listening. In fact, she rambled on for two and a half minutes about the so-called “reforms” in the military justice system’s approach to prosecuting alleged instances of sexual assault before Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond T. Odierno got a word in edgewise. And the video was only three minutes and two seconds long!

I guess that’s how she plays the game.

To learn more about the Senator McCaskill’s misguided push for reforms in the prosecution of cases of sexual assault cases — real and imagined — in the military, read my series, “War On Men in the Military.”

To learn more about one case, in particular, that resulted in the wrongful conviction and imprisonment of Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, order a copy of Three Days In August.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Michael Behenna Gives First Post-Prison Television Interview

Michael Behenna, the former Army Ranger officer whose wrongful conviction has been the subject of dozens of pieces during the past four years, gave is first television interview yesterday, 12 days after being released on parole from military prison.

News9.com – Oklahoma City, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports |

To see photos of the location in Iraq where the shooting of the known Al-Qaeda operative Ali Mansur took place, read Photos Show Scene Where Trail of Injustice Began.

Culvert-3-Low-RezTo read Carrie Fatigante’s nine-part series about Behenna’s case, go to The Michael Behenna Story: Getting Personal.

To read about the Army’s refusal to release a copy of the investigation report about the incident involving Behenna, read go to Army 15-6 Investigation Report Proves Elusive.

To learn about former Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Stewart, one of the wrongfully-convicted men Behenna talked about during the television interview, order a copy of my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct '11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May '13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August (Oct ’11) and THE CLAPPER MEMO (May ’13). To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Military Justice System Headed Down Same Path as Healthcare

“If you like your military, you can keep your military.”

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, the deputy commanding general of support with the 82nd Airborne Division and Regional Command-South, speaks with Afghan media outside of a school near Forward Operating Base Howz-e-Madad in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Nov. 16, 2011. Sinclair was attending an open house, where Afghan students received backpacks full of school supplies. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amanda Hils/Released)

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, then-deputy commanding general of support with the 82nd Airborne Division and Regional Command-South, speaks with Afghan media Nov. 16, 2011. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amanda Hils/Released)

To my knowledge, President Barack Obama hasn’t said that yet — at least, not in public. But the military justice system seems to be headed down the same path as the nation’s healthcare system.

Unlike the debate regarding healthcare, the debate about the need for military justice reforms involves people in positions of power (i.e., President Obama and members of Congress) who have absolutely no concept of what is necessary in a military justice system, because they have never served. Led by people like Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), they advocate steps that will only worsen an already-flawed system.

One person who seems to understand what’s at stake is Patti Fruit, a resident of the Fayetteville, N.C., area near Fort Bragg. While I don’t agree with everything she wrote in a letter to the editor of the Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer about the headline-making outcome of Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair’s court-martial, I do agree with the following point she made:

“Yes, he admits to adultery with underlings, but why military women who have achieved rank did not have the honor and courage to report the general’s advances from the beginning is a question that needs addressing.”

What was the outcome of General Sinclair’s case? Sexual assault charges against him were dropped after political influence, in lieu of facts, was cited as the driving force behind a higher-ranking general’s decision to prosecute Sinclair.

One-hundred-eighty-degrees opposite Ms. Fruit, members of The New York Times Editorial Board revealed in a letter published today that they don’t have a clue about the military justice system.  Their lack of a “clue” is illustrated in the two paragraphs highlighted below:

The deal followed a stunning ruling by a military judge last week suggesting that by holding out for more severe punishment, and by rejecting an earlier plea deal, the senior Army officer overseeing the prosecution might have been improperly influenced by political considerations in bringing the most severe charges against the general because of a desire to show new resolve in the military against sexual misconduct. The prosecution had also been badly shaken by revelations that the general’s accuser may have lied under oath.

The episode offers a textbook example of justice gone awry, providing yet another reason to overhaul the existing military justice system, which gives commanding officers with built-in conflicts of interest — rather than trained and independent military prosecutors outside the chain of command — the power to decide which sexual assault cases to try.

The Times Editorial Board’s description of this week’s happenings in the case as “a textbook example of justice gone awry, providing yet another reason to overhaul the existing military justice system” is about as truthful as any of President Obama’s promises concerning the so-called Affordable Care Act (a.k.a., “ObamaCare”).

Three Days In August by Bob McCarty

Click on image above to order book.

“If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor,” the president said.  We all know how long that promise lasted.

“If you like your plan, you can keep your plan,” the president said.  Tell that to the hundreds of thousands of Americans who’ve lost coverage since ObamaCare went “live.”

“We’re going to work with employers to lower your premiums by up to $2,500 per family per year,” the president said.

Rather than telling us “If you like your military, you can keep your military,” it appears President Obama and his sycophants on The Left are determined to dismantle it without asking for input from anyone else and without regard for or our nation’s security.  In short, the military justice system seems destined toward the same fate as healthcare and, sadly, Republicans in Congress seem to lack the wherewithal (a.k.a., “spines”) to do anything about it.If Americans don’t stand up and demand their politicians stop meddling with the military, then they’ll deserve the military that’s left standing.  And it won’t be pretty.  Or, for that matter, an effective fighting force.

To learn more about sexual assault prosecutions in the military, read my series, “War On Men in the Military.”

To learn more about the case involving Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, order a copy of Three Days In August, the nonfiction book in which I chronicle his life story and wrongful conviction in a U.S. military courtroom in Germany.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Polygraph Expert Sends Message to Author Prior to Radio Interview

About 90 minutes before I went on the air Thursday as a guest of George Noory during the first two hours of his show, Coast to Coast AM, I received an email from a man who described himself as a certified polygraph examiner on the East Coast. The subject line: “Polygraph examiners will be tuning in tonight!”

George Noory, Host of "Coast to Coast AM"

George Noory, Host of “Coast to Coast AM”

Because I was about to speak to three million listeners about my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, via 506 radio stations across the United States and in Canada, Mexico and Guam, the message caught my attention.

Below, I share the text of that message, minus the sender’s name and minus a portion of one paragraph, the content of which would make him easy to identify and, perhaps, too susceptible to unwanted repercussions as a result:

Bob,

I am a polygraph examiner who has alerted (via a LinkedIn forum) potentially hundreds of my colleagues — as well as the forces behind the polygraph establishment — about your radio appearance tonight.

Expect to take some calls from some hardcore polygraph apologists who may wish to refute some of your claims. The usual suspects come to mind.

Personally, I am skeptical of the science behind polygraph, and even more cautious about the forces behind the polygraph industry. As a self-described polygraph realist, I am challenging the American Polygraph Association’s (sic) thinking on the alleged science behind polygraph, and am proposing that the APA not only take on a countermeasure challenge — similar to what George Maschke has long proposed — but to endorse a “Bill of Rights” for polygraph test takers to help prevent future polygraph abuse.

As a result of my strident stance (as evidenced by numerous postings on several polygraph forums) and admitted contact with Marisa Taylor of McClatchy News Service, I am viewed by the polygraph establishment as an iconoclast and apostate. Still, I think there are enough progressives and realists within the APA to help set a new course for polygraph’s future.

Best wishes for tonight. Although it will be late back east, I will do my best to tune in for the duration. Should I fade, there’s always the C2C podcast.

Regards,

Name Withheld

P.S. In September, I bought the Kindle edition of “The Clapper Memo” prior to a flight to Asia, which helped make the journey bearable. A great read!

Click on the image above to order the book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, shown superimposed on a photo of an M4 carbine. Photo credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar.

Click on the image above to order the book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, shown superimposed on a photo of an M4 carbine. Photo credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar.

During the first hour of the broadcast, Noory and I discussed the many details I uncovered about the federal government’s use of credibility assessment tools, including the polygraph, and we discussed many suspect findings that surfaced during my four-year investigation into the subject.

During the second hour, Noory and I fielded a mix of questions from callers across the country. While most of the callers were friendly, a few were not.

One man, in particular, went so far as to challenge my credibility by saying he didn’t believe I had ever spoken to any Army Green Berets, Navy SEALs or intelligence experts. I responded to him two ways.

First, I pointed out that I do have friends in the Special Forces community and had even written a book, Three Days In August, about one of them, former Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart.

Next, I told him I was not going to behave like Vice President Joe Biden and break the bond of trust I’ve established with my “Quiet Professionals” friends who agreed to share details about their work in exchange for my promise that I would not reveal their names to the world.

I guess I could have pointed him to the names of people who endorsed THE CLAPPER MEMO, but I’m not sure that would have helped with this particular caller. Oh well.

If you missed the show live, you can download a podcast (subscription required). After listening to the show, be sure to get the whole story by ordering a copy of THE CLAPPER MEMO.

UPDATE 3/15/14 at 2:42 p.m. Central:  Bob McCarty’s Appearance on ‘Coast to Coast AM’ (Audio).

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Behenna Released From Prison

GREAT NEWS! First Lieutenant Michael Behenna, the young Army Ranger officer sent to prison for killing a known al-Qaeda operative in Iraq, walked out of the U.S. Military Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., this morning, bound for his hometown of Edmond, Okla., barely a month after being granted parole by the U.S. Army Clemency and Parole Board in Washington, D.C.

Behenna, 30, spent five years behind bars after being sentenced to 25 years and, later, having that term reduced to 15 years.  While there, he and Army Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, the man whose life story is chronicled in my book, Three Days In August: A U.S. Army Special Forces Soldier’s Fight For Military Justice, became good friends behind bars at Fort Leavenworth.

Since June 4, 2009, I’ve written and published more than 60 articles about Behenna’s case, including the four highlighted below:

Army 15-6 Investigation Report Proves Elusive (Jan. 15, 2013);

Is Army Protecting Someone in Officer’s Chain of Command? (Aug. 20, 2012);

American Warfighters Deserve Same Consideration as Taliban (July 17, 2012); and

Photos Show Scene Where Trail of Injustice Began (Feb. 10, 2010).

Best wishes to all, and welcome home, Michael!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Listen To ‘Coast to Coast AM’ Beginning at Midnight Central

George Noory

George Noory

TALK RADIO ALERT: Tune in to Coast to Coast AM with host George Noory beginning at Midnight Central tonight! I’ll be on the show for two hours to discuss THE CLAPPER MEMO, my second nonfiction book in which I share the findings of my exhaustive four-year investigation into the federal government’s use of so-called “credibility assessment” technologies, including the polygraph.

The list of topics we’ll discuss includes, but will not be limited to, the Edward Snowden/NSA spying scandal, the “Green-on-Blue” or “Insider” attacks in Afghanistan and the interrogation of detainees at Guantanamo Bay. In addition, we’ll discuss how these topics connect to the “turf war” that’s raged silently for more than 40 years between polygraph loyalists and all challengers to their century-old technology.

Coast to Coast AM airs on more than 560 stations in the U.S., as well as Canada, Mexico and Guam, and is heard by nearly three million weekly listeners. To find a station near you, click here.

PSST!  I might even get the chance to say a few words about my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

UPDATE 3/14/14 at 9:37 a.m. Central:  Seven and a half hours ago, I wrapped up my two-hour guest appearance on Coast to Coast AM.  Funniest moment:  A caller told host George Noory and me that his employer years earlier had required him to take frequent polygraphs. When I asked the man what kind of work he did, he said he was a projectionist at an X-rated theater.  Huh?  Also had a caller accuse me of making up stuff about knowing Army Rangers, Green Berets, Navy SEALs, etc. I told him that, unlike Joe Biden, I was not going to divulge the names of any of the “Quiet Professionals” to whom I made a promise of anonymity.  To download a podcast (subscription required) of the show, click here.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

War on Men in the Military: Cases Shockingly Similar

While reading a WRAL.com article today, I couldn’t help but notice similarities between the sexual assault prosecutions of Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair and Sgt. 1st Class Kelly A. Stewart, the man whose wrongful conviction is chronicled in my first nonfiction book, Three Days In August.

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, the deputy commanding general of support with the 82nd Airborne Division and Regional Command-South, speaks with Afghan media outside of a school near Forward Operating Base Howz-e-Madad in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Nov. 16, 2011. Sinclair was attending an open house, where Afghan students received backpacks full of school supplies. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amanda Hils/Released)

U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair is shown near Forward Operating Base Howz-e-Madad in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Nov. 16, 2011. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amanda Hils/Released)

One example can be found in the three paragraphs that follow an explanation of how the military judge in the case decided to prosecute despite a recommendation from the lead prosecutor that General Sinclair’s plea to a charge of adultery be accepted.  The example begins in paragraph four as follows:

The defense contends that the captain, who served with Sinclair in Iraq and Afghanistan, committed perjury in a January hearing about finding text messages form Sinclair on an old cellphone, making her a poor witness on which to build a case against the general.

The captain said in the January hearing that she came across the old phone in December and charged it up to see if there was anything on it that would affect Sinclair’s court-martial. A defense forensics expert contradicted her testimony, saying she had turned the phone on several times in the months before she said she found it packed in a box.

The defense argues in the motion that the Army continues to press the case only to support a get-tough policy against sex assault in the military.

Notice the word, perjury, and how a forensics expert proved it?  Apparently, perjury by a female in a military sexual assault case isn’t cause for concern.

In the case of Stewart, a highly-decorated Green Beret combat veteran, several instances of perjury surfaced during and after his court-martial.

Read the reviews.

Read the reviews.

Two that surfaced during the trial involved a German police detective and a taxi driver whose memory issues are highlighted in the article, German Police Detective Has Memory Issues Like Accuser.

One arose during the pre-sentencing phase and involved the accuser offering a strange definition of “contact.”

Yet another was brought to the court’s attention by a long-time friend of the accuser who made a post-trial statement that should have netted Stewart a new trial.

I, for one, can’t wait to read the trial transcript if or when General Sinclair’s case reaches the trial phase.  Why?  Because I suspect it will be as chock full of half-truths, lies and innuendo as Stewart’s trial was as the War on Men in the Military continues.

UPDATE 3/16/2014 at 8:11 p.m. Central:  Sexual assault charges dropped against general after case tainted by political influence.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Pentagon Contracting Blunders Highlighted in Article, Book

In his latest article in The Washington Times, Rowan Scarborough tells a story of poor decision-making at the Pentagon that is very similar to the story I tell in my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

The book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, is shown superimposed on a photo of an M4 carbine. Photo credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar.

The book, THE CLAPPER MEMO, is shown superimposed on a photo of an M4 carbine. Photo credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc. Ken Scar.

Scarborough reports on Department of Defense decision-making that has resulted in the flawed M4 carbine being foisted upon Soldiers who, in order to have it work somewhat reliably, must make their own modifications to it.

What happens to Soldiers unable to make those mods? I think the answer to that question is obvious.

In THE CLAPPER MEMO, I use nearly 300 pages to reveal how the same kind of decision-making has resulted in the century-old polygraph remaining as DoD’s credibility assessment technology of choice even after a newer technology proved itself less expensive and more accurate.

Along the way, I share never-before-published details about key decisions made by top DoD officials — including Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. when he was serving as Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence — and about key decisions that need to be made in the future to correct grievous wrongs.

Retired U.S. Navy Capt. Larry W. Bailey came to understand the gravity of this situation after reading THE CLAPPER MEMO. In fact, the former commander of the U.S. Navy SEALs training program described what I reveal in the book as “an unconscionable cover-up.” Others have offered similar assessments.

See if you agree. Order your copy today!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Townhall Columnist Shows He Understands What’s At Stake

Be sure to read Mark Baisley’s latest Townhall.com article, When Technology War Kills Our Own Soldiers, in which he shares his review of my latest nonfiction book, THE CLAPPER MEMO.

Click on image above to connect to article at Townhall.com.

Click on image above to connect to article at Townhall.com.

For more information about the book, visit http://TheClapperMemo.com.

To order either or both of my books, click here or on the graphic below. Thanks!

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.

Bob McCarty is the author of Three Days In August and THE CLAPPER MEMO. To learn more about either book or to place an order, click on the graphic above.